A SPECIAL PURPOSE
PRIVATE SCHOOL

Accredited by:
AdvancEd
Utah State Board of Education
 
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Geography For Life 09-04-00-00-030 (original credit, 1.00)
U.S. Government 09-06-00-00-020 (original credit, .50)
United States History 09-05-00-00-050 (original credit, 1.00)
World Civilizations 09-05-00-00-091 (original credit, 1.00)
Language Arts 9-12 06-02-00-00-040 (original credit, 4.00)
Mathematical Essentials 07-07-00-00-050 (original credit, .50)
Mathematics of Personal Finance 07-07-00-00-020 (original credit, .50)
Algebra I 07-02-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Algebra II 07-02-00-00-020 (original credit, 1.00)
Geometry 07-05-00-00-001 (original credit, 1.00)
CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Mathematics I 07-08-00-00-090 (original credit, 1.00)
CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Mathematics II 07-08-00-00-100 (original credit, 1.00)
CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Math III 07-08-00-00-100 (original credit, 1.00)
Biology 08-02-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Chemistry 08-03-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Earth Science 08-04-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Fitness for Life 04-02-00-00-030 (original credit, .50)
Health Education 04-01-00-00-010 (original credit, .50)
Participation Skills and Techniques 04-02-00-00-080 (original credit, .50))
Computer Technology 05-04-00-00-001 (original credit, .50)
Financial Literacy 01-00-00-00-100 (original credit, .50))
Fine Arts History and Criticism 02-01-00-00-020 (original credit, 1.00)
Electives

Geography For Life 09-04-00-00-030 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will understand the world in spatial terms. Students will understand the human and physical characteristics of places and regions. Students will understand how physical processes shape the earth's surface. Students will understand how human activities shape the earth's surface. Students will understand the interaction of physical and human systems. Students will use geographic knowledge to connect to today's world.

U.S. Government 09-06-00-00-020 (original credit, .50)
Students will understand the significance and impact of the Constitution on everyday life. Students will understand the protections and privileges of individuals and groups in the United States. Students will understand the distribution of power in the national, state, and local government in the United States federal system. Students will understand the responsibilities of citizens in the United States. Students will understand basic economic principles and how they influence everyday life. Students will understand the relationship between the United States and the international system.

United States History 09-05-00-00-050 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will expand their knowledge of pre-Reconstruction America. Students will understand how the growth of industry changed the United States. Students will recognize how social reform occurred at the turn of the century. Students will understand how war affected the early 20th century. Students will understand how Americans reacted to rapid social change during the 1920's. Students will understand how the Great Depression and the New Deal affected the United States. Students will understand the causes, course, and consequences of the United States' role in World War II. Students will understand the United States' domestic and international position in the Cold War era. The students will understand the emergence and development of the human rights and culture in the modern era. The students will understand the economic and political changes in contemporary America.

World Civilizations 09-05-00-00-091 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will gain an understanding of early civilizations and their contributions to the foundations of human culture. Students will comprehend the contributions of classical civilizations. Students will investigate the diffusion and interaction of cultures from the Classical Period through the Age of Discovery. Students will understand the influence of revolution and social change in the transition from early modern to contemporary societies. Students will understand the interaction of peoples in the global integration of the 20th century.

Language Arts 09 06-02-00-00-040 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text. Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others. Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

Language Arts 10 06-02-00-00-050 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text. Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others. Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

Language Arts 11 06-02-00-00-060 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text. Students will write informational and literary text to reflect on and recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others. Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

Language Arts 12 06-02-00-00-070 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use vocabulary development and an understanding of text elements and structures to comprehend literary and informational grade level text. Students will write inform national and literary text to reflect on and recreate experiences, report observations, and persuade others. Students will understand the process of seeking and giving information in conversations, group discussions, written reports, and oral presentations.

Mathematical Essentials 07-07-00-00-050 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will acquire number sense and perform operations with real numbers. Students will represent and analyze mathematical situations and properties using patterns, relations, functions, and algebraic symbols. Students will solve problems using spatial and logical reasoning, applications of geometric principles, and modeling. Students will understand and apply measurement tools, formulas, and techniques. Students will draw conclusions using concepts of probability, after collecting, organizing, and analyzing a data set.

Mathematics of Personal Finance 07-07-00-00-020 (original credit, .50))
Students will use a rational decision-making process to set and implement financial goals. Students will understand sources of income and the relationship between income and career preparation. Students will understand principles of money management. Students will understand principles of money management. Students will understand savings, investing, and retirement planning.

Algebra I 07-02-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will expand number sense to understand, perform operations, and solve problems with real numbers. Students will extend concepts of proportion to represent and analyze linear relations. Students will develop fluency with the language and operations of algebra to analyze and represent relationships. Students will understand concepts from statistics and apply statistical methods to solve problems.

Algebra II 07-02-00-00-020 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use the language and operations of algebra to evaluate, analyze and solve problems. Students will understand and represent functions and analyze function behavior. Students will use algebraic, spatial, and logical reasoning to solve geometry and measurement problems. Students will understand concepts from probability and statistics and apply statistical methods to solve problems.

Geometry 07-05-00-00-001 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use algebraic, spatial, and logical reasoning to solve geometry problems. Students will use the language and operations of algebra to explore geometric relationships with coordinate geometry. Students will extend concepts of proportion and similarity to trigonometric ratios. Students will use measurement tools, formulas, and techniques to explore geometric relationships and solve problems.

CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Mathematics I 07-08-00-00-090 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will use quantities to model and analyze situations, to interpret expressions, and by creating equations to describe situations. Students will learn function notation and develop the concepts of domain and range. Students build on and informally extend their understanding of integer exponents to consider exponential functions. Students will analyze and explain the process of solving an equation and to justify the process used in solving a system of equations. Students develop fluency writing, interpreting, and translating between various forms of linear equations and inequalities, and using them to solve problems. Students explore systems of equations and inequalities, and they find and interpret their solutions. Students use regression techniques to describe approximately linear relationships between quantities. Students establish triangle congruence criteria, based on analyses of rigid motions and formal constructions. Students use a rectangular coordinate system to verify geometric relationships, including properties of special triangles and quadrilaterals and slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines.

CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Mathematics II 07-08-00-00-100 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will extend the laws of exponents to rational exponents and explore distinctions between rational and irrational numbers by considering their decimal representations. Students will learn that when quadratic equations do not have real solutions the number system must be extended so that solutions exist, analogous to the way in which extending the whole numbers to the negative numbers allows x+1 = 0 to have a solution. Students explore relationships between number systems: whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and complex numbers. The guiding principle is that equations with no solutions in one number system may have solutions in a larger number system. Students will consider quadratic functions, comparing the key characteristics of quadratic functions to those of linear and exponential functions. They select from among these functions to model phenomena. Students will learn to anticipate the graph of a quadratic function by interpreting various forms of quadratic expressions. In particular, they identify the real solutions of a quadratic equation as the zeros of a related quadratic function. When quadratic equations do not have real solutions, students will learn that that the graph of the related quadratic function does not cross the horizontal axis. They expand their experience with functions to include more specialized functions - absolute value, step, and those that are piecewise - defined. Students will focus on the structure of expressions, rewriting expressions to clarify and reveal aspects of the relationship they represent. They create and solve equations, inequalities, and systems of equations involving exponential and quadratic expressions. Building on probability concepts that began in the middle grades, students will use the languages of set theory to expand their ability to compute and interpret theoretical and experimental probabilities for compound events, attending to mutually exclusive events, independent events, and conditional probability. Students will make use of geometric probability models wherever possible. They use probability to make informed decisions. Students will apply their earlier experience with dilations and proportional reasoning to build a formal understanding of similarity. They identify criteria for similarity of triangles, use similarity to solve problems, and apply similarity in right triangles to understand right triangle trigonometry, with particular attention to special right triangles and the Pythagorean theorem. Students will develop facility with geometric proof. They use what they know about congruence and similarity to prove theorems involving lines, angles, triangles, and other polygons. They explore a variety of formats for writing proofs. Students will prove basic theorems about circles, such as a tangent line is perpendicular to a radius, inscribed angle theorem, and theorems about chords, secants, and tangents dealing with segment lengths and angle measures. They will study relationships among segments on chords, secants, and tangents as an application of similarity. In the Cartesian coordinate system, students will use the distance formula to write the equation of a circle when given the radius and the coordinates of its center, and the equation of a parabola with vertical axis when given an equation of its directrix and the coordinates of its focus. Given an equation of a circle, they will draw the graph in the coordinate plane, and apply techniques for solving quadratic equations to determine intersections between lines and circles or a parabola and between two circles. Students will develop informal arguments justifying common formulas for circumference, area, and volume of geometric objects, especially those related to circles.

CCSS Mathematics, Secondary Mathematics III 07-08-00-00-100 (original credit, 1.00)
It is in Mathematics III that students pull together and apply the accumulation of learning that they have from their previous courses, with content grouped into four critical areas, organized into units. They apply methods from probability and statistics to draw inferences and conclusions from data. Students expand their repertoire of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions.3 They expand their study of right triangle trigonometry to include general triangles. And, finally, students bring together all of their experience with functions and geometry to create models and solve contextual problems. The Mathematical Practice Standards apply throughout each course and, together with the content standards, prescribe that students experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations. Critical Area 1: In this unit, students see how the visual displays and summary statistics they learned in earlier grades relate to different types of data and to probability distributions. They identify different ways of collecting data— including sample surveys, experiments, and simulations—and the role that randomness and careful design play in the conclusions that can be drawn. Critical Area 2: This unit develops the structural similarities between the system of polynomials and the system of integers. Students draw on analogies between polynomial arithmetic and base-ten computation, focusing on properties of operations, particularly the distributive property. Students connect multiplication of polynomials with multiplication of multi-digit integers, and division of polynomials with long division of integers. Students identify zeros of polynomials and make connections between zeros of polynomials and solutions of polynomial equations. The unit culminates with the fundamental theorem of algebra. Rational numbers extend the arithmetic of integers by allowing division by all numbers except 0. Similarly, rational expressions extend the arithmetic of polynomials by allowing division by all polynomials except the zero polynomial. A central theme of this unit is that the arithmetic of rational expressions is governed by the same rules as the arithmetic of rational numbers. Critical Area 3: Students develop the Laws of Sines and Cosines in order to find missing measures of general (not necessarily right) triangles. They are able to distinguish whether three given measures (angles or sides) define 0, 1, 2, or infinitely many triangles. This discussion of general triangles open up the idea of trigonometry applied beyond the right triangle—that is, at least to obtuse angles. Students build on this idea to develop the notion of radian measure for angles and extend the domain of the trigonometric functions to all real numbers. They apply this knowledge to model simple periodic phenomena. Critical Area 4: In this unit students synthesize and generalize what they have learned about a variety of function families. They extend their work with exponential functions to include solving exponential equations with logarithms. They explore the effects of transformations on graphs of diverse functions, including functions arising in an application, in order to abstract the general principle that transformations on a graph always have the same effect regardless of the type of the underlying functions. They identify appropriate types of functions to model a situation, they adjust parameters to improve the model, and they compare models by analyzing appropriateness of fit and making judgments about the domain over which a model is a good fit. The description of modeling as "the process of choosing and using mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to make decisions" is at the heart of this unit. The narrative discussion and diagram of the modeling cycle should be considered when knowledge of functions, statistics, and geometry is applied in a modeling context.

Biology 08-02-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will understand that living organisms interact with one another and their environment. Students will understand that all organisms are composed of one or more cells that are made of molecules, come from preexisting cells, and perform life functions. Students will understand the relationship between structure and function of organs and organ systems. Students will understand that genetic information coded in DNA is passed from parents to offspring by sexual and asexual reproduction. The basic structure of DNA is the same in all living things. Changes in DNA may alter genetic expression. Students will understand that biological diversity is a result of evolutionary processes.

Chemistry 08-03-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will understand that all matter in the universe has a common origin and is made of atoms, which have structure and can be systematically arranged on the periodic table. Students will understand the relationship between energy changes in the atom specific to the movement of electrons between energy levels in an atom resulting in the emission or absorption of quantum energy. They will also understand that the emission of high-energy particles results from nuclear changes and that matter can be converted to energy during nuclear reactions. Students will understand chemical bonding and the relationship of the type of bonding to the chemical and physical properties of substances. Students will understand that in chemical reactions matter and energy change forms, but the amounts of matter and energy do not change. Students will understand that many factors influence chemical reactions and some reactions can achieve a state of dynamic equilibrium. Students will understand the properties that describe solutions in terms of concentration, solutes, solvents, and the behavior of acids and bases.

Earth Science 08-04-00-00-010 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will understand the scientific evidence that supports theories that explain how the universe and solar system developed. Students will understand that the features of Earth's evolving environment affect living systems, and that life on Earth is unique in the solar system. Students will understand that gravity, density, and convection move Earth's plates and this movement causes the plates to impact other Earth systems. Students will understand that water cycles through and between reservoirs in the hydrosphere and affects the other spheres of the Earth system. Students will understand that Earth's atmosphere interacts with and is altered by the lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere. Students will understand the source and distribution of energy on Earth and its effects on Earth systems.

Fitness for Life 04-02-00-00-030 (original credit, .50)
Students will demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities. Students will demonstrate understanding of movement, fitness and nutrition concepts, principles, and strategies as they apply to the learning and performance of fitness activities. Students will participate regularly in physical activity. Students will achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness. Students will exhibit responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings. Students will value physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and/or social interaction.

Health Education 04-01-00-00-010 (original credit, .50)
Students will demonstrate knowledge, skills, and strategies related to mental and emotional health to enhance self-concept and relationships with others. Students will use nutrition and fitness information, skills, and strategies to enhance health. Students will demonstrate health-promoting and risk-reducing behaviors to prevent substance abuse. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply prevention and intervention knowledge, skills, and processes to promote safety in the home, school, and community. Students will understand and summarize concepts related to health promotion and the prevention of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Students will demonstrate knowledge of human development, social skills, and strategies that encourage healthy relationships and healthy growth throughout life.

Participation Skills and Techniques 04-02-00-00-080 (original credit, .50)
Students will demonstrate competency in motor skills and movement patterns needed to perform a variety of physical activities. Students will demonstrate understanding of movement, fitness and nutrition concepts, principles, and strategies as they apply to the performance of movement activities. Students will participate regularly in physical activity. Students will achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness. Students will exhibit responsible personal and social behavior that respects self and others in physical activity settings. Students will value physical activity for health, enjoyment, challenge, self-expression, and/or social interaction.

Computer Technology 05-04-00-00-001 (original credit, .50)
Students will enhance keyboarding skills. Students will develop knowledge of computer basics and use an operating system. Students will apply document-processing skills. Each student will be able to use the following when creating a letter, memo, report, or other business document. Students will create spreadsheets and manipulate data. Each student will be able to perform the following tasks. Students will demonstrate an understanding of ethics related to computer technology. Each student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the following topics. Students will access on-line information resources. Each student will be able to perform the following tasks. Students will successfully use electronic mail (email). Using his/her own account, each student will be able to perform the following tasks. Students will use their document processing, spreadsheet, and/or electronic presentation skills to complete a cross curricular project during the semester (or trimester, etc.,) in which they are enrolled in the Computer Technology course.

Financial Literacy 01-00-00-00-100 (original credit, .50)
Students will use a rational decision-making process to set and implement financial goals. Students will understand sources of income and the relationship between income and career preparation. Students will understand principles of money management. Students will understand savings, investing, and retirement planning.

Fine Arts History and Criticism 02-01-00-00-020 (original credit, 1.00)
Students will examine how works of art were created by manipulating media and by organizing images with art elements and principles. Students will find meaning by analyzing, criticizing, and evaluating works of art. Students will discover meaning in art.

Electives
The American Civil War
American Short Stories, I and II
European Short Stories, I and II
Folklore and Fairy Tales, I and II
Gunfights and Outlaws
Great Explorations
Greek Mythology
Illustrated Man
The Jungle Book
Poetry, I and II
Shakespeare
World War II